LucyMackSmith
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King Edward I

King Edward I[1, 2]  Additional Information on King Edward I - I29941

Male 1239 - 1307  (68 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name , Edward 
    Prefix King 
    Suffix
    Nickname Longshanks 
    Born 17 Jun 1239  Westminster, Middlesex, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 21 Jun 1239  Westminster, Middlesex, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 7 Jul 1307  Carlisle, Cumberland, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 28 Oct 1307  Westminster, Middlesex, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID i29941  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith | Joseph Sr., Lucy Mack
    Last Modified 25 Oct 2014 

    Father ENGLAND, King Henry III ,   b. 24 Sep 1206, Winchester, Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Nov 1272, Westminster, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Mother ENGLAND, Eleonore ,   b. Abt 1219, Aix, Puy-de-Dôme, Auvergne, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jun 1291, Ambresbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Married 14 Jan 1236  Canterbury, Kent, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F17756  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 King Edward I   Additional Information on King Edward I - I29941,   b. 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jul 1307, Carlisle, Cumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 5 Aug 1254  Burgos, Castille and Leon, SpainFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. PLANTAGENET, Princess Joan ,   b. 1272, Galilee, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Apr 1307, Clare, Suffolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2014 16:38:04 
    Family ID F11113  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 King Edward I   Additional Information on King Edward I - I29941,   b. 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jul 1307, Carlisle, Cumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 8 Sep 1299  Canterbury, Kent, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married Canterbury Cathedral, Kent, England.
    Children 
     1. PLANTAGENET, Prince Thomas ,   b. 1 Jun 1300, Brotherton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 8 Aug 1338  (Age > 38 years)
    +2. ENGLAND, Edmund ,   b. 5 Aug 1301, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Mar 1330, Winchester, Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 28 years)
     3. ENGLAND, Eleanore ,   b. 4 May 1306, Winchester, Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1311, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2014 16:38:04 
    Family ID F11114  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 King Edward I   Additional Information on King Edward I - I29941,   b. 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jul 1307, Carlisle, Cumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 1254  Burgos, Castille and Leon, SpainFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. ENGLAND, Eleanor ,   b. 1264, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1298, Ghent, Flandre, Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years)
     2. ENGLAND, Joan ,   b. 1265, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   bur. 7 Sep 1265, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 0 years)
     3. ENGLAND, John ,   b. 10 Jul 1266, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Aug 1272  (Age 6 years)
     4. ENGLAND, Henry ,   b. 1268, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 14 Oct 1274, Windsor, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 6 years)
     5. ENGLAND, Julian ,   b. 1271, Akko, Galilee, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1271, Akko, Galilee, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +6. PLANTAGENET, Princess Joan ,   b. 1272, Galilee, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Apr 1307, Clare, Suffolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years)
     7. ENGLAND, Alphonso ,   b. 24 Nov 1273, Bayonne, Pyrennes, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Aug 1284, Windsor Castle, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 10 years)
     8. ENGLAND, Isabell ,   b. Abt 1274, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. ENGLAND, Margaret ,   b. 11 Sep 1275, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1318, Windsor, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
     10. ENGLAND, Berengaria ,   b. 1276, Kennington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1277  (Age 1 years)
     11. ENGLAND, Mary ,   b. 11 Mar 1278, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 22 Jul 1332  (Age < 54 years)
     12. ENGLAND, Alice ,   b. 12 Mar 1279, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1291, Chadford, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 11 years)
    +13. PLANTAGENET, Princess Elizabeth ,   b. 5 Aug 1282, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 May 1316, Quendon, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years)
     14. ENGLAND, Blanche ,   b. 1283, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    +15. ENGLAND, King Edward II ,   b. 2 May 1284, Caernarvonshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Sep 1327, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years)
     16. ENGLAND, Beatrice ,   b. 1285, Toulouse, Aquitaine, France Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2014 16:38:04 
    Family ID F12298  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 17 Jun 1239 - Westminster, Middlesex, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 21 Jun 1239 - Westminster, Middlesex, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1254 - Burgos, Castille and Leon, Spain Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 5 Aug 1254 - Burgos, Castille and Leon, Spain Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 8 Sep 1299 - Canterbury, Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 7 Jul 1307 - Carlisle, Cumberland, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 28 Oct 1307 - Westminster, Middlesex, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    King Edward I Longshanks
    King Edward I Longshanks

  • Notes 
    • --Other Fields Ref Number: 452 (proved) John Claypoole RIN 2548 Dorothy Wingfield RIN 1484 to Robert Wingfield RIN 1499 to Robert Wingfield RIN 2259 to Henry Wingfield RIN 2217 to Elizabeth Goushill RIN 21472 married Robertus Wingfield RIN 21768 to Elizabeth De Bohun/Fitzalan RIN 2409 to Humphrey De Bohen RIN 2462 to Elizabeth Plantagenet RIN 2457 to Edward I King of England RIN 13491 and Eleanor of Castile and Leon RIN 133304 descended through Fatimah RIN 33152 to Mohammad, the Prophet RIN 33137 our 41st Great Grandfather to Ishmael RIN 31921 to Abraham RIN 32549 to Adam and Eve RIN 2564. ------------------------ Sources for all the Virginia Harris Families: (Much of above supplied by J. McFarland Williams who does guarantee exactness.) Harris Descent From Norman and English Royal Lines as herein. Virginia Magazine Vol. IV Brown's Genesis of the United States. Harris Chart by William G. Stanard. Boddie's Virginia Historical Genealogies. Adventures of Purse and Person. Virginia Court Records. Family Records and Memoirs. Americans of Royal Descent by Brownings. Virginia Historical Genealogies by John B. Boddie Harris Family Descent From Sovereign Princes of Wales Royal Line of Succession, P. W. Montague-Smith, Associate Editor (The Family Tree of Elizabeth, Second, of England). Other Sources. --------------------------- Descent From the English Crown - Edward I 1239-1307 King of England, 5th Plantagenet King, eldest son of King Henry III and wife, Eleanor, called "Longshanks", was born at Westminister on June 17, 1239. He was proclaimed King immediately following his father's death in 1272 even though he was not in the country at the time. He did not return until 1274 whereupon he was crowned King Edward I. He upheld the "Magna Charta" and proclaimed it anew in 1297, established Courts of law as instigated by his great grandfather, King Henry II, and the reforms of his Uncle, by marriage, Simon de Montfort. A large part of his reign was spent in trying to subdue Scotland and Wales to English Subjection. In this he was only partly successful. He established the 'Prince of Wales' in 1301, a custom followed today, making him heir to the throne of England. This was a tactful act to placate the Welch and succeeded very well Much progress was made during his reign in establishing law and order and uniform control of the country. General prosperity abounded. It was under his rule that representation of the House of Commons became regular. The Kingdom prospered in all fields but the King died on July 7, 1307, while on an armed expedition again at Scotland, to combat a revolt. He was immediately replaced as King by his son, Edward II. Edward I was married to Eleanor, a half sister of King Alfonso X, of Castile (now a part of Spain), Oct. 31, 1254. She died in 1290 and 1299 he married Margaret, sister of King Philip IV of France. From these marriages there were six sons and nine daughters (as shown herein). ------------------------- Harris Descent From Norman and English Royal Lines- Edward I, 1239-1307, married Eleanor, d. 1290, dau. of Ferdinand III, of Castile Prince Edward, son of King Henry III, was given power to rule England in his father's stead and soon the country became quiet and peaceful. In 1270, the young Prince left for a crusade to Palestine and on Nov. 16, 1272, Henry III died and Prince Edward was immediately proclaimed to be King Edward I, of England. As the country was peaceful and prosperous he did not return until 1274. Henry III was wedded to Eleaner, daughter of Raymondo Berenger, Count of Province, a sister of Margaret, wife of King Louis IX, of France, on Jan 14, 1236. (Children are herein.) Edward the First, King of England: Born at Westminster, 15th Kal: July, anno 1239, and christened on the fourth day after. Knighted at his marriage, 1254, by Alfonso, King of Castile. Undertook a crusade to the Holy Land 1269, captured Nazareth. Crowned in the Abbey Church of Westminster, 14th Kal: Sept (19th Aug), 1274. Conquered Scotland in 1296 and captured the Stone of Scone. Died at Burgh-on-the-Sands, on the nones (7th July), 1307; buried in the Abbey Church aforesaid,18th Oct. following. Ref: From David Clarkson to Edward the First, King of England extracted from the Records of the College of Arms, London by William Courthope, Somerset and Registrar found by Kristen Turley Bone at the Pennsylvania Historical Society on 13th and Locust, Philadelphia September 1995 and copied by Christine Stewart FHL SLC 1995. Ephraim Blood Line. Charlemagne descends by fifteen generations to Eleanor of Castile, who married Edward I, of England and to a direct descendant on this line from Antenor, Chief Prince of Ephraim. Ref: Complete Peerage 942.D21c Wurts Magna Charta The Battle Abbey Roll 942 D2bb Baker's Hist of Northumberland Q942.55 H2ba Hereward, The Saxon Patriot 929.242 H264h History and Antiquity of Beverly Oliver 942.77b5 h26 Plantagenet Ancestry Q942.D2t Nichols Hist and Antiquity of Lancasters Q942.54 H2nic Dictionary of Nat'l Biography 920.042 D561n Searle's Anglo Saxon Bishops, Kings & Nobles 942.D22awy History of Yorkshire Preface Q942.74 D22ha Ormerod's History of Cheshire 942.71.H2or British Families 942.D2dh Edward I is sometimes referred to as "the English Justinian." He had a love for justice, honor, and order in his affairs. At one point in his reign, he faced a declaration of war with France and rebellions from the Welsh and Scots. He decided that the only way to overcome his difficulties would be to elicit the support of his people. In 1295 he called together a parliament consisting of representives of the nobility, the church, and the common people. This "Model Parliament" marked the beginning of parliamentary government in England, a system which has continued to the present day. "What touches all," Edward proclaimed, "should be met by measures agreed upon in common." He restricted the power of the king by accepting the rule that taxes could not be levied or laws made except by the consent of parliament. Medieval London: A City of Palaces by Walter Besant Medieval London is well known for having been full of rich monasteries, nunneries, colleges, and parish churches. So much so that it might be compared to the 'Ile Sonnante 'of Rabelais. If it could be called a 'City of Churches', it was, in fact, much more a 'City of Palaces'. For there were, in London, more palaces than in Verona and Florence and Venice and Genoa all put together. There was not, it is true, a line of marble 'palazzi 'along the banks of a Grande Canale; there was no Piazza della Signoria, no Piazza della Erbe to show these buildings. They were scattered about all over the City. They were built without regard to general effect and with no idea of decoration or picturesqueness. They lay hidden in narrow winding labyrinthine streets. The warehouses stood beside and between them. The common people dwelt in narrow courts around them. They faced each other on opposite sides of the lanes. These palaces belonged to the great nobles and were their town houses. They were capacious enough to accommodate the whole of a baron's retinue, consisting sometimes of four, six, or even eight hundred men. The continual presence of these lords and their following did much more for the City than merely to add to its splendour by the erecting of great houses. By their residence they prevented the place from becoming merely a trading centre or an aggregate of merchants. They kept the citizens in touch with the rest of the kingdom. They made the people of London understand that they belonged to the Realm of England. When Warwick, 'the Kingmaker' rode through the streets to his town house, followed by five hundred retainers in his livery; when King Edward the Fourth brought wife and children to the City and left them there under the protection of the Londoners while he rode out to fight for his crown; when a royal tournament was held in 'Chepe' - the Queen and her ladies looking on - then the very schoolboys learned and understood that there was more in the world than mere buying and selling, importing and exporting. Everything must not be measured by profit. They were traders indeed, and yet subjects of an ancient crown. Their own prosperity stood or fell with the well-doing of the country. It was this which made the Londoners ardent politicians from very early times. They knew the party leaders who had lived among them; the City was compelled to take a side, and the citizens quickly perceived that their own side always won - a thing which gratified their pride. In a word, the presence in their midst of king and nobles made them look beyond their walls. London was never a Ghent; nor was it a Venice. It was never London for itself against the world, but always London for England first, and for its own interests next. Again the City palaces, the town houses of the nobles, were at no time, it must be remembered, fortresses. The only fortresses of the City were the Tower of London, the short-lived Montfichet Tower and the original Baynard's Castle. Though even the latter was rebuilt as a palace of the nobility. The nobles' homes were neither castellated nor fortified nor garrisoned. They were entered by a gate, but there was neither ditch nor portcullis. The gate - only a pair of wooden doors - led into an open court round which the buildings stood. Examples of this way of building may still be seen in London. For instance, Staple Inn or Barnard's Inn, afford an excellent illustration of a medieval mansion. There are in each two square courts with a gateway leading from the road into the Inn. Between the courts is a hall with its kitchen and buttery. Gray's Inn and Old Square, Lincoln's Inn are also good examples. Sion College, before it was destroyed, showed the hall and the court. Hampton Court is a late example, the position of the Hall having been changed. Gresham House was built about a court; so was the Mansion House. Until the late nineteenth century, Northumberland House at Charing Cross illustrated the disposition of such mansions. Those who walk down Queen Victoria Street in the City pass on the north side a red brick house standing round three sides of a quadrangle. This is the College of Arms. In the late nineteenth century, it preserved its fourth side with a gateway. Five hundred years ago this was the town-house of the Earls of Derby. Restore the front and you have the size of a great noble's town palace, yet not one of the largest. If you wish to understand the disposition of such a building as a nobleman's town house, compare it with the Quadrangle of Clare or that of Queens', Cambridge. Derby House was burned down in the Great Fire of London and was rebuilt, largely as we see it today, without its hall, kitchen, and butteries, for which there was no longer any use. Before the Fire, a broad and noble arch with a low tower, but showing no appearance of fortification, opened into the square court which was used as an exercising ground for the men at arms. In the rooms around the court was their sleeping accommodation. At the side or opposite the entrance stood the hall where the whole household took meals. Opposite the hall was the kitchen with its butteries. Over the butteries was the room called the Solar, where the Earl and Countess slept. Beyond the hall was another room called the Lady's Bower, where the ladies could retire from the rough talk of their followers. The houses beside the river were provided with stairs, at the foot of which was kept the state barge in which my Lord and Lady took the air on fine days and were rowed to and from the Court at Westminster. There remains nothing of these houses. They are, with one exception, all swept away. Yet the description of one or two, the site of others, and the actual remains of one sufficiently prove their magnificence. Edited by David Nash Ford, from Walter Besant's 'London '(1892). --------------------------- (a) Edward the First: King Edward the First was twice married: first to Eleanor, sister of Alphonso XI., King of Castile, in Spain; and secondly to Margaret, daughter of Philip III., King of France. Of this second marriage were horn Thomas Planagenet at Brotherton (a small village in Yorkshire), A.D. 1300, who, in consequence, was called De Brotherton; who was created Earl of Norfolk, and made "Marshal of England." This Thomas Plantagenet left two daughters, from one of whom came--1. The Mowbays and Howards (1a) Dukes of Norfolk. 2. The Earls of Suffolk. 3. The earls of Carlisle. 4. The Earls of Effingham. 5. The Lords Stanford. 6. The Lords Berkely. 7. The Marquises of Salisbury. From the other daughter of Thomas Plantagenet the Ord family is descended. Edmund, the second son of King Edward the First, by the second marriage was created the Earl of Kent. (1a) Howards: For the ancestors of the "Howard" family, see No. 104, on the "MacDowall" pedigree. (2) Crinan: According to some authorities Beatrix was twice married: first, to Crinan who was Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, and the son of Duncan, who was Abbot of Dunkeld; and, secondly, to the Lord of the Isles. By Crinan, Beatrix had Maldred, Cospatrick, and Duncan I. (d. 1041), King of Scotland, who is no. 108 on the foregoing Lineal Descent. (3) Buidhe: From this Eochaidh Buidhe the Boyd family derives its surname. (4) Monarch of Ireland: For the period during which each of the Irish Monarchs mentioned in this Table, reigned, see the "Roll of the Monarchs of Ireland since the Milesian Conquest." (5) Ancestor: See the pedigree of "O'Hart;" carefully traced from this Monarch, who reigned in the second century of our era, down to the present time (A.D. 1887). It is a curious fact that no other name than No. 81 on the foregoing Table is the origin of any other Irish surname on record! SUFFIX: Also shown as I,King Longshanks BIRTH RITE: Also shown as Christening Westminster, England. BIRTH RITE: Also shown as Christening 14 Jun 1239 DEATH: Also shown as Died Sando-n-Carlisle, England. DEATH: Also shown as Died 29 Jun 1307 BURIAL: Also shown as Buried Westminster Abbe, London, England. BURIAL: Also shown as Buried 20 Oct 1307 SURNAME: Also shown as England BIRTH: Also shown as Born 18 Jun 1239 BIRTH RITE: Also shown as Christening 22 Jun 1239 DEATH: Also shown as Died Chamberlin, England. BURIAL: Also shown as Buried Westminster, London, England.

  • Sources 
    1. [S4359] Source 4359 (please edit title), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996).

    2. [S4360] Source 4360 (please edit title), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Reliability: 3).